Blogpost
21 December 2020
Blogpost
Joint Blog Series of Vasudha Foundation and Germanwatch discussing the design of Green & Resilient Recovery in India through renewable energy development and systemic resilience building.

Against the background of the social, economic and political COVID-19 effects on India, all business-as-usual scenarios for economic development and emission trends of Indian and resilient society building are outdated. There is both the possibility of an accelerated structural change to renewable energy, away from fossil fuels and combustion engines and the danger of a massive rebound effect for the emissions path. The same width of possibilities exists between society-wide resilience building and intensified inequality.
The question of what India's recovery strategy - and international support - will look like will create central path dependencies. Especially now, in the new challenge of the Corona crisis, India needs reliable and strong partners such as Germany and the EU to enter into more sustainable pathway through the recovery packages. Strategies for green and resilient recovery and NDC implementation and increase go hand in hand.

Blogpost
18 December 2020
Blogpost
Joint blogs of Vasudha Foundation and Germanwatch on the design of Green & Resilient Recovery in India through renewable energy development and systemic resilience building.

As of 2019, in addition to ensuring food security, agriculture has contributed 15.9% to the Indian GDP and employed 42.3% of its population. Despite its high reliance on monsoons, agriculture continues to be the largest provider of livelihoods in rural India. India is among the top three producers of wheat, pulses, cotton, rice, fruits, vegetables and peanuts in the world. This translates to about USD 38.5 billion worth of agricultural and processed foods export to over 200 countries – making up for 12.6% of Indian exports.

Blogpost
18 December 2020
Blogpost
Joint blog of Vasudha Foundation and Germanwatch on the design of Green & Resilient Recovery in India through renewable energy development and systemic resilience building.

Against the background of the social, economic and political COVID-19 effects on India, all business-as-usual scenarios for economic development and emission trends of Indian and resilient society building are outdated. There is both the possibility of an accelerated structural change to renewable energy, away from fossil fuels and combustion engines and the danger of a massive rebound effect for the emissions path. The same width of possibilities exists between society-wide resilience building and intensified inequality.

Blogpost
18 December 2020
Blogpost
Joint blog of Vasudha Foundation and Germanwatch on the design of Green & Resilient Recovery in India through renewable energy development and systemic resilience building.

Against the background of the social, economic and political COVID-19 effects on India, all business-as-usual scenarios for economic development and emission trends of Indian and resilient society building are outdated. There is both the possibility of an accelerated structural change to renewable energy, away from fossil fuels and combustion engines and the danger of a massive rebound effect for the emissions path. The same width of possibilities exists between society-wide resilience building and intensified inequality.

Blogpost
18 December 2020
Blogpost
Joint blogs of Vasudha Foundation and Germanwatch on the design of Green & Resilient Recovery in India through renewable energy development and systemic resilience building.

Against the background of the social, economic and political COVID-19 effects on India, all business-as-usual scenarios for economic development and emission trends of Indian and resilient society building are outdated. There is both the possibility of an accelerated structural change to renewable energy, away from fossil fuels and combustion engines and the danger of a massive rebound effect for the emissions path. The same width of possibilities exists between society-wide resilience building and intensified inequality.

Press Release
07 December 2020
Pressemitteilung
New ranking of 58 countries with the highest emissions published today: None of the countries surveyed are on a path compatible with the Paris Agreement goals / Emissions are decreasing in more than half of the countries analyzed / USA is at the bottom of the ranking

The Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI) 2021 published today paints a mixed picture of progress by the European Union (EU) on climate action. While the Scandinavian EU countries, Portugal and the EU as a whole rank high on the index with relatively good indicators, Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic stand out as outliers on climate progress within the bloc. In the overall ranking, the EU has improved from the 22nd place last year to the 16th place this year, almost exclusively thanks to a much better rated climate policy. The CCPI analyzes and compares climate protection across 57 countries (plus EU as a whole) with the highest emissions, which together account for 90 percent of global emissions.

Publication
07 December 2020
Cover CCPI 2021

Published annually since 2005, the Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI) is an independent monitoring tool for tracking the climate protection performance of 57 countries and the EU. It aims to enhance transparency in international climate politics and enables comparison of climate protection efforts and progress made by individual countries.

Publication
07 December 2020
Cover Methodology CCPI2021

The Climate Change Performance Index compares 57 countries and the EU in the areas of Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Renewable Energies, Energy Use and Climate Policy, thus providing a comprehensive overview of the current efforts and progress of the countries analyzed. Besides, it measures how well countries are on track to meet the global goals of the Paris Agreement by evaluating the current status and future targets of each category with reference to a well-below 2°C pathway. This brochure explains the background and methodology of the Climate Change Performance Index.

News
02 December 2020
5 years Huaraz
Watch the video of the online event on 5 years "Huaraz Case"

Five years ago, legal history in terms of climate protection was written: Thanks to the courageous filing of a civil lawsuit against RWE, Europe's largest CO2 emitter, by the Peruvian mountain guide and farmer Saúl Luciano Lliuya in November 2015. To celebrate this important milestone, Saúl Luciano Lliuya, his lawyer and his supporters*, came together to look back on the past five years, take stock and venture a look into the future. Watch the video of the event.

Blogpost
26 November 2020
Blogbeitrag Huaraz: Anwältin Dr. Roda Verheyen und Kläger Saúl Luciano Lliuya

Am 24. November 2015 zog Saúl Luciano Lliuya aus der peruanischen Andenstadt Huaraz für den Schutz seines Lebensraumes vor ein deutsches Gericht. Er reichte seine Klage ein, um einen der größten Emittenten für die Folgen seiner klimaschädlichen Wirtschaftsweise haftbar zu machen. Mit dem Fall Huaraz wurde juristisches Neuland betreten. Inzwischen ist es eine weltweit wahrgenommene Musterklage, die es in die Beweisaufnahme geschafft hat und eine Signalwirkung wie keine andere Klage entfaltet.