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Blog Liste

Blogpost
28 May 2019
Tokio

In Japan, this year's G20 host, awareness of climate-related risks has risen in recent years. However, the road to a fully sustainable financial system is still long.

Blogpost
21 May 2019
Riddarholmen from Stockholm City Hall tower

Not only cities and municipalities, but also the real estate industry are driving the market for green bonds in Sweden, making the country a pioneer in sustainable finance. However, there are still no binding standards.

Blogpost
14 May 2019
Pekinger Geschäftsviertel

China is following ambitious green finance plans – also for its investments overseas. But some standards are too low and should be tightened. So far, coal investments have also been considered green if the projects are "cleaner".

Blogpost
07 May 2019
Finanzdistrikt von Toronto, der größten Stadt Kanadas. (Foto: Ken Lund/​Flickr)

For Canada, the concept of a sustainable finance is still relatively new. But its importance is growing steadily and can become a model of success for the country.

Blogpost
29 April 2019
Paris

Already in 2015, France adopted a law on climate risk disclosure paving the way for protecting economic systems from the consequences of climate change. But others need to follow.

Blogpost
26 April 2019
COP24

The role sustainable lifestyles can play in achieving a paradigm shift to sustainability is acknowledged in both the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement of 2015. They can be defined as “responsible living with our total surrounding and ourselves”, thus including aspects like global equity (see previous blogpost). Nevertheless, the vast majority of scientific literature focuses on ecological sustainability.

Blogpost
23 April 2019
Luxembourg

The small country in the heart of Europe portraits itself as a leader in "sustainable finance". Already in 2007, the first green bonds were issued and now there is also a "green" stock exchange. However, demand and reality do not coincide enough.

Blogpost
15 April 2019
Bank of England 1920 addition

The year 2019 will be key for future climate policy in Germany and Europe. Finance plays a key role in improving climate protection and sustainable growth.
To this end, Germany should learn from pioneering countries for “Green Finance”. In the seven articles in our series, international authors will therefore explain their country's approach towards a green financial system, addressing opportunities, hurdles and unanswered questions.

Blogpost
06 December 2018
Blog Platzhalter

Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) can play a critical role in limiting climate change and helping communities adapt to its impacts. Since 2011, they have provided nearly $200 billion in finance for climate change mitigation and adaptation (so-called “climate finance”). The World Bank Group’s recent announcement that it will increase its climate-related investments means this number is likely to grow. But while climate finance is important, it makes up less than a quarter of all finance provided by the MDBs. The rest goes to activities that may (or may not) undermine climate goals.

Blogpost
08 November 2018
Blog Platzhalter
Marion Cadier speaks with Dr. Roda Verheyen (legal counsel in Lliuya v. RWE AG), Roxana Baldrich (Policy Advisor at Germanwatch) and Christoph Bals (Policy Director at Germanwatch) about the lawsuit brought by Saul Luciano Lliuya against RWE in relation to its contribution to climate change (the Huaraz case).

In November 2015, Saúl Luciano Lliuya, a Peruvian farmer living in Huaraz in Peru, filed a lawsuit in Germany against RWE, Germany’s largest electricity producer. Mr Lliuya claims that his house in the village of Huaraz is at imminent risk of being damaged or destroyed due to an outburst flood from a glacial lake, caused by the melting of glaciers linked to climate change.

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